PS5 SSD storage expansion

The PlayStation 5 launch is just around the corner and, as a result, important details about the product are coming in thick and fast. Recently, Sony dished out some information regarding the SSD storage expansion slot of the PS5, which confirms long-running speculations.

After PS5 Hardware Architect Mark Cerny’s initial hint earlier this year, Sony has now officially confirmed that PS5 won’t support SSD storage expansion at launch. The console giant will instead unlock this feature as part of a future update.

In case you didn’t know, SSD storage is a flagship aspect of next-gen console gaming. It greatly reduces loading screen time, provides high read-write speeds that make the games run without a hitch, and offers a lightning-fast file transfer rate with compatible devices.

The PS5 uses an NVMe SSD inside and comes with a storage expansion slot compatible with M.2 SSDs. However, not all M.2 SSDs are compatible with Sony’s latest console, and the firm will release a list of compatible storage expansion options in the near future.

Back in March, Cerny hinted that fans may have to wait before they can use the SSD expansion feature. “It’d be great if that happened by launch, but it’s likely to be a bit past it,” he said.

Now, the expected delay in PS5’s SSD expansion slot support is officially confirmed, as reported by The Verge. Talking about storage options compatible with the new console, Sony revealed, “[T]his is reserved for a future update.”

Also Read: The Sony PS5 Teardown Shows There’s Plenty To Be Excited About

If it isn’t clear already, this means that Sony is still conducting compatibility testing with third party SSD storage devices. We may expect the company to release an official list of supported devices around the start of 2021.

The PlayStation 5 will launch next week, on November 12, in a number of countries, including the U. S. and Canada. Soon after that, it will arrive in India on November 19, 2020.

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Priye is a tech writer at Fossbytes, who mainly covers games but also writes about anything remotely related to tech, including apps, phones, CPUs, and GPUs. He prefers to be called a "video game journalist" and grimaces when he doesn't get to be "Player 1." If you want to talk about games or send any feedback, drop him a mail at [email protected]