New Microsoft Video Justifies Why Old PCs Can’t Run Windows 11

Microsoft thought it through before enforcing harsh requirements.

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Windows 11 has already made a lot of rounds in the tech community. But it did garner some harsh criticism as well over its new system requirements. Microsoft is only allowing newer generation Intel and AMD CPUs to support the new OS. The older PCs with CPUs including 7th Gen Intel Core machines, even if they have the TPM chip inside, can’t run Windows 11.

Microsoft has given some relaxation and allowed clean Windows 11 installations on older machines but depriving them of software updates. In its latest stunt, the company released a video last week (spotted by Windows Latest) explaining why it implemented such strict system requirements.

Microsoft Explains Windows 11 Security Measures

The video is basically meant to cover the Windows 11 security aspects and includes a live demonstration of attacks. It also covers how hardware-level protections like TPM 2.0 can help us keep our machines secure.

One point highlighted in the video is that Microsoft wants all devices on the same page. While some older PCs do come with features like Secure Boot, TPM, Virtualization-based Security (VBS), there might be some that don’. Or their security might not be as intended by the company.

The harsh actions that the company took were mainly because they want to set a standard for Windows PCs. With the rise in cyber-attacks, it’s quite easy to breach Windows PCs without the newly-enforced security features. Moreover, the Windows name has stained over the years when it comes to security, and this is Microsoft’s attempt to fix it.

The video demonstrated how a hacker could breach a PC, and how these security enforcements with Windows 11 prevent it. Microsoft is preventing older PCs with Legacy BIOS mode, and the ones without a TPM 2.0 environment. Likewise, Microsoft is trying to minimize the damage done if a PC is compromised. While it’s a ruthless move, it surely is a step in the right direction.

Siddharth Dudeja

Siddharth Dudeja

An engineering student with a keen interest in most aspects of technology. Likes to write about Microsoft, Apple, Laptops, Gaming, etc.

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