Your iPhone Won’t Let You Drive If You’re Drunk

Apple want to build a breathalyzer into the iPhone!

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Your iPhone Won't Let You Drive If You're Drunk
Image: PatentlyApple

Apple bagged a new patent that reveals a breathalyzer-like device in the iPhone. It could work in tandem with the Apple Car Key to promote safe driving. Moreover, it could restrict entry into the vehicle if the driver is intoxicated beyond safe levels.

Apple could integrate the breathalyzer function into the iPhone, Apple Watch, or an accessory that clips onto the iPhone. It could also replace standalone breathalyzers used by law enforcement.

Apple Breathalyzer Patent

PatentlyApple spotted the patent won by Apple for a breathalyzer device. The patent designs reveal some key features of how the whole system would work. It is inconclusive whether Apple will embed the functionality to measure breath quality in iPhone or Apple watch.

Measuring alcohol levels using the existing device could be a little difficult. However, it could be a purely software-based approach to measure intoxication levels in a person.

Apple
Image: PatentlyApple

The images published by PatentlyApple reveal that Apple could add a series of checks to measure intoxication. The first image reveals that the driver would need to pass the breathalyzer check to access the Apple Car Key. If the driver passes the safety check, then the Apple Car Key would unlock the vehicle. Otherwise, the driver would not be able to access the car keys.

Is it viable?

Driving under influence can result in serious harm to both the driver and passerby. Apple breathalyzer function could do wonders in reducing drunk drivers on the freeway. But there are a lot of lingering questions about the device and its implementation.

Firstly, how would Apple measure the intoxication levels? Will it be purely software-based or require an additional device? Apple loves making accessories and the breathalyzer could be an accessory too.

Moreover, the restrictions sound absurd at the first glance. If a user doesn’t pass the breathalyzer check, will they be allowed entry into the vehicle or not? Or they would be left to freeze outside the bar?

Apple registers and wins a lot of patents for devices but only a few of them live to see the light of the day. What do you think of this breathalyzer patent? Is it possible to measure intoxication levels using iPhone? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Abhishek Mishra

Abhishek Mishra

I love exploring technology and devote my time to curating detailed posts and supplying credible information to inquisitive users. I wish I had some spare time to play a few RPGs or clean my desk.