iPhone teardown
Image: iFixit

A collection of eleven videos (now removed) were uploaded on YouTube. According to a Motherboard report, these are believed to be leaked videos of the internal repair process Apple uses for iPhone and Mac. Amran Haji, the uploader of these videos sourced them from a now-suspended Twitter account.

It’s hard to believe something like this belonging to a highly secretive company would come out in broad daylight. Apple hasn’t commented on the videos, but Motherboard’s sources said they are real.

Still, there is a big question mark on whether the videos are genuine. But what could give a feeling of authenticity is that the videos carry Apple copyright, include references to Apple documentation and diagnostic tests. Also, Apple’s proprietary disassembles and repair tools are used.

One thing that sparked the interest of many people is the repair processes which have a resemblance to the methods of DIY repair community and third-party tech support guys.

A name taken in particular is of iFixit. A video of the opening of an iPhone is very similar to how iFixit guys do it. Similarly, another video showing iPhone X’s battery replacement is very close to that of iFixit.

If the videos in the talks are indeed real, then these people have achieved great heights at reverse-engineering Apple’s repair process without having access to its official documentation.

On the other hand, Apple has been criticised for its unwillingness towards opening up its devices for third party repair or at least making it easier. But that doesn’t happen because offering repair services to fix broken devices brings another load of cash under Apple’s roof.

Also Read: How To Use The New USB Restricted Mode In iPhone? (It’s Not Foolproof!)