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it@ubuntu free and open source software

Short Bytes: Kerala adopted Free and Open Source Software in 2005 in a phased manner and went on to replace proprietary software. As a result, Kerala annually saves $58 million (Rs 300 crore). Thanks to the Free Software license, people are able to freely copy and distribute the software.

At Fossbytes, we strive to tell you the biggest developments in the open source world and how they impact the general technology world. Just in case you don’t know much about open source, feel free to read what’s open source software and open source hardware.

Having said that, we’ve told you numerous stories that involved European cities and countries choosing open source software. But, today, I’m going to tell you about an Indian state that has been doing so for a long time.

In Kerala, IT became a compulsory subject in 2003. It was followed by the phased adoption of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in 2005. This was done to replace the proprietary software.

K. Anwar Sadath, executive director [email protected], said that they have been given the job for easy classroom teaching, teachers’ training, and customization of applications, reports AINS.

Mr. Sadath said that the proprietary version of a software would have incurred a minimum cost of Rs 150,000 per machine in terms of the license fee. Considering the 20,000 machines, the annual saving is minimum Rs 300 crore ($58 million). He further adds that the free nature of FOSS allows the people to copy and share software without any restriction.

Kerala IT News reports that Ubuntu Linux is loaded in all laptops and desktops for school. Also, the revised textbook would include GNUKhata as a replacement for Tally and LibreOffice as a replacement for Microsoft Office.

Do you have some interesting local story regarding the adoption of open source software? Feel free to share it with us and we might feature it on Fossbytes.

Bonus Video: 10 Interesting Linux Facts

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