What Is The Screen Curtain In iOS? How To Use It?

Keep your phone screen hidden from the prying eye.

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screen curtain ios
Image: Illustration by author

As far as accessibility features go, Screen Curtain is an integral feature of iOS, iPadOS, and macOS devices. It is part of VoiceOver, allowing visually-impaired users to navigate their iPhone or Mac conveniently.

While VoiceOver reads out the text on the screen, Screen Curtain hides the same text by turning the display off when it’s not needed. This helps prevent someone else’s curious eyes from viewing any sensitive information.

Some common instances where this feature becomes useful are accessing contact details, checking bank account balance, viewing personal notes, etc.

How do I enable Screen Curtain?

To use the Screen Curtain feature, VoiceOver must be enabled on your device beforehand. Below we can tell you how to enable VoiceOver and Screen Curtain on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.

On your iPhone or iPad:

  1. Go to Settings.
  2. Tap on “Accessibility.”
  3. Tap on “VoiceOver” and enable it.
  4. Turn off the screen and then wake up your device.
  5. Using three fingers, tap on the screen thrice to enable Screen Curtain. (You would have to use four three-finger taps if the Zoom feature is enabled.)

To turn off either feature, repeat the steps.

On Mac:

  1. Hit Command + F5 key combination simultaneously to turn on VoiceOver.
  2. Now, press VO + Shift + Fn + _ to enable Screen Curtain.

To disable it later, you can use the same keyboard shortcut.

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This wraps up our short explainer-cum-guide on using Screen Curtain on Apple devices.

If you like this simple explainer, check out our Short Bytes section. We take complex tech topics and break them into short, easy-to-understand articles.

Priye Rai

Priye Rai

Priye is a tech writer at Fossbytes, who writes about gaming and anything remotely related to tech, including smartphones, apps, OTT, etc. He prefers to be called a "video game journalist" and grimaces when he doesn't get to be "Player 1." If you want to talk about games or send any feedback, drop him a mail at [email protected]

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