VNC Roulette: How One Hacker Is Exposing Thousands Of Hackable Computers

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please hack me im insecure vnc rouletteplease hack me im insecure vnc roulette

please hack me im insecure vnc rouletteplease hack me im insecure vnc rouletteShort Bytes: A hacker has scanned the web for insecure systems using Virtual Network Computing (VNC) and collected an enormous amount of screenshots of such desktops. He has posted these pictures online on a website named VNC Roulette to make people aware and expose this threat.

VNC Roulette is one of the most bizarre places on the internet. There are chances that one moment you’ll stumble upon someone’s home automation system and the next moment you are staring at someone’s bank account. Give it few more minutes and you might land something weirder. This would look like a drill to you but these are vulnerable computer systems from our real world.

The hacker who created VNC Roulette is inspired by those who are using Virtual Network Computing (VNC) but fail to secure a connection with a password. It’s basically a website that features thousands of screenshots that were collected from random and unsafe computers.

VNC is an open source software that allows people to remotely access and control a computer from anywhere in the world. Well, if you forget to add a password while setting things up, anyone can scan the web and access your computer.

A Moroccan grey-hat hacker, who goes by the moniker Revolver, scanned the web to see how many insecure computers are out there. He has now 23 gigabytes of screenshots and he hasn’t posted many of them on VNC Roulette to stay out of trouble.

“This is deep f**k. We had access to sysadmins boxes, big machines with sensitive data. There is no security at all,” Revolver says.

“Once you install a VNC server, it will pop a f**king big interface or message saying you should make a password for security. And [most people] don’t make that password,” he adds.

Scanned insecure systems on the web isn’t a new idea and it something that could be done by even a low-grade hacker. Shodan, the hackers’ search engine, provides similar functionality.

You can visit VNC Roulette and see the screenshots yourself. Just in case the website doesn’t load due to traffic load, here are some examples of systems running Windows XP, Linux, a plant control system, someone’s Facebook window and a hospital record. Take a look:

vnc roulette xp vnc roulette linuxplant-overview-open-vnc vnc roulette facebook patient-records-vnc-rouletteHave something to add? Share your views in the comments below.

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Adarsh Verma

Adarsh Verma

Fossbytes co-founder and an aspiring entrepreneur who keeps a close eye on open source, tech giants, and security. Get in touch with him by sending an email — [email protected]
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