tim berners-lee turning award

Short Bytes: MIT professor and web inventor Tim Berners-Lee has been awarded the Turing Award. Often called the Nobel Prize of Computing, this award also comes with a $1 million prize provided by Google. In its announcement, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) cited Berners-Lee for inventing the Web, web browser, and fundamentals of the web.

Without a doubt, Tim Berners-Lee is one of the world’s most influential people when it comes to issues like online privacy and transparency. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has now awarded him the 2016 Turing Award.

Often called the Nobel Prize for Computing, this award is given to individuals who make “major contributions of lasting importance to computing.” In its announcement, ACM cited him for “inventing the World Wide Web, the first web browser, and the fundamental protocols and algorithms allowing the web to scale.” This year’s award marks the 50th anniversary of Turing Award.

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Berners-Lee, who pioneered the web in 1989 at CERN, created URLs, HTTP, and HTML. He was also honored with the knighthood in 2003. Berners-Lee currently is a full-time professor at MIT.

In a statement, ACM President Vicki L. Hanson added that it’s hard to imagine the world before the invention of World Wide Web. Berners-Lee also offered a vision of how each element of the web should work together, Hanson added.

This award is also backed by Google with a $1 million prize.

In response to this award, Berners-Lee said that he’s humbled to get an honor that has been presented to some of the most brilliant minds in the world.

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