You Are Better At Quantum Physics Than Supercomputers — This Video Game Shows Why

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quantum-moves.0.0

quantum-moves.0.0Short Bytes: Quantum physicists are trying to solve the quantum physics problem using a game called Quantum Moves. This game asks a human to grab and move a well of water from one to another spot. Using this game, they want to teach the machines about the human’s intuitive learning and guesswork.

With a game named as Quantum Moves, which is available for Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android, Danish Scientists and researchers want to help machines in learning how humans act, think, and play intuitively. This will help the researchers to better understand how quantum computing actually works.

The game can be downloaded from the scienceathome.org website. It downloads in the form of a .zip file which can be later extracted to a .exe file which is basically a game application. Once the game is installed, you can either play the game as a guest or you can also register.

The data generated is sent to the scientists and researchers. The game is easy to understand and play. Basically, in Quantum Moves, the challenge for the player is to manipulate a well of water on a movable line, and carry a volume of sloshing liquid from one spot to another.

This game is aimed to find the human tendency in grabbing and moving a specific atom with a laser in a quantum computer. This is something computers aren’t especially good at, and that’s where humans are better at quantum physics than supercomputers.

By this way, a machine will be able to get better at physics challenges that humans solve with intuition and guesswork because machine learns from the numerical calculations.

The players solve a very complex problem by creating simple strategies. Where a computer goes through all available options, players automatically search for a solution that intuitively feels right. Through our analysis we found that there are common features in the players’ solutions, providing a glimpse into the shared intuition of humanity. If we can teach computers to recognise these good solutions, calculations will be much faster. In a sense, we are downloading our common intuition to the computer.
— said physicist Jacob Sherson from Aarhus University.

Also Read: Quantum Computing Operating System Developed, Powerful PCs Coming Soon

Amar Shekhar

Amar Shekhar

A passionate adventure traveller over Trekkerpedia.com and Author of the book 'The Girl from the Woods'.

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