Mozilla firefox send

Mozilla has officially released a file sharing service called Firefox Send which uses end-to-end encryption to keep shared files private.

Firefox Send was previously available as a “Test Pilot” experiment since August 2017. Mozilla took quite some time to smoothen the edges and ensure that the service will work for more than just a handful of people at once.

The service works just like your regular fire sharing service available online and accessible in all browsers at send.firefox.com.

Users can upload a file on Mozilla’s servers which are first encrypted in the browser and then stored in the cloud. You can share a link to the uploaded files with anyone.

The upside of this service is that all the uploaded files are encrypted and offer a self-destruct option. You can set the files to expire after a certain period or auto-delete itself as soon as the recipient finishes downloading the file.

This means Mozilla won’t hold onto large files indefinitely like other file storage services, such as Google Drive or Dropbox, do.

Moreover, the uploaded files can be protected by a password that you can share with the recipient in private to avoid unauthorized downloads of sensitive data.

The files can be uploaded one at a time or in batch, which Firefox Send automatically assembles in one big ZIP file.

The service supports files up to 1GB in size by default, but if users sign up or sign in using their Firefox account, the limit for sending files increases up to 2.5GB.

Firefox Send is currently available through the web portal, but Mozilla says that the service will be made available as an Android app in beta later this week.

Also Read: Windows 10 Brings Android Apps To Your PC With “Phone Screen”

Now Watch: