Microsoft Launches $40M AI Initiative For Helping Humanity

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Microsoft AI for humanitarian initiative
Microsoft

AI is already helping the big companies process data and develop futuristic products. Microsoft wants to use artificial intelligence for the benefit of humanity.

The Redmond-based tech giant has launched a $40 million AI for Humanitarian Action Initiative. The five-year plan will focus on four fronts, namely disaster response, needs of children, refugees, and displaced people and human rights.

In an official blog post, Brad Smith, Microsoft’s President, and Chief Legal Officer said, “We believe that technology, like artificial intelligence (AI) combined with cloud technology, can be a game changer, helping save more lives, alleviate suffering and restore human dignity by changing the way frontline relief organizations anticipate, predict and better target response efforts.”

The plan is a part of Microsoft’s AI for Good suite, which is aimed at providing solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges with the help of AI.

Microsoft said that they will partner with selected non-governmental organizations and humanitarian groups and will provide them with financial grants, technology investments, and access to their data science know-how and AI expertise.

For disaster response, the company will deploy artificial intelligence and data modeling for helping responders provide aid efficiently.

Microsoft already uses predictive analytics and bot frameworks for tracking human trafficking. Now, its plans for children involve using AI for developing the first-ever genomics database for combating Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

It is expected that Microsoft will provide more insights into the initiative at its ongoing Microsoft Ignite event where it has already announced its unified, AI-powered search experience.

Also Read: Microsoft Is Building The World’s First Scalable Quantum Computer
Anmol Sachdeva

Anmol Sachdeva

Anmol is a tech journalist who handles reportage of cybersecurity and Apple and OnePlus devices at Fossbytes. He's an ambivert who is striving hard to appease existential crisis by eating, writing, and scrolling through memes.

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