Intel Claims Its Low Power Display Tech Can Cut Battery Use By 50%

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Among many announcements made at Computex 2018, one from Intel could give a sense of satisfaction to the users who concerned about the battery life of the computers. Becuase, the display is the component that gobbles battery the most.

Intel claims its new tech called Low Power Display can cut the LCD power consumption by half. To bring it to fruition, Intel co-engineered it with Sharp and Innolux. The two manufacturers are developing 1 Watt display panels using the technology.

So, what’re the results? Intel says their Low Power Display could deliver around 4 to 8 hours of extra juice when watching videos locally. On some devices, the overall battery backup could be up to 28 hours. Intel refers to the tests it ran on a Windows 10 device running a Core i7-855U with 8GB RAM, Intel 600p SSD, and Intel UHD Graphics 620.

On paper, this is 3 hours more than what’s said in the case of the recently announced Snapdragon 850 SoC designed for Arm-based Windows 10 PCs.

Intel demoed its tech on a Dell XPS 13 featuring a low power display. It goes without saying that the advantage would be available in upcoming devices. Also, it would require the device to be running Intel graphics.

These power efficient displays could be a part of Intel’s efforts to retain its market. It may not be the very next day, but, Arm-powered PCs could be a potential threat to Intel’s decades of dominance. The company has already lost the battle in the smartphone segment.

Also Read: Asus Launches ROG Phone For Gamers: Snapdragon 845, 512GB Storage, And External Cooling
Aditya Tiwari

Aditya Tiwari

Aditya likes to cover topics related to Microsoft, Windows 10, Apple Watch, and interesting gadgets. But when he is not working, you can find him binge-watching random videos on YouTube (after he has wasted an hour on Netflix trying to find a good show). Reach out at [email protected]

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