Zoom End to end encryption

With the Coronavirus lockdown affecting industries in their day to day functioning, video conferencing apps are making life easier for businesses.

One particular video conferencing app that achieved the pinnacle of success during the quarantine period is Zoom. But as quickly as it rose, the downfall due to persistent security reasons was equally magnificent.

Now, hackers are using the popularity of the Zoom app to target remote workers. A report by TrendMicro says that hackers are luring users into downloading the Zoom app from third-party websites, and the unofficial links are bundled with RevCode WebMonitor RAT.

WebMonitor remote access tool (RAT) creates a backdoor in your system for crooks to monitor almost anything you are doing on your PC. The RAT could be used for operations such as keylogging, capturing a screenshot, and recording video streams from a webcam to steal personal and useful information.

The report mentions that hackers are sending links via phishing email campaigns, and the RAT is installed on the target machine along with the Zoom app.

They have ensured that the RAT terminates itself if it’s executed in a virtual environment, as it involves the risk of being identified by security researchers and users.

Bundling RAT with the legit Zoom app eliminates the chances of suspicion by users, as the video recording app works flawlessly, and the monitoring software is installed covertly in the background.

However, it is noticed that hackers usually push the Zoom version 4.6 as opposed to the currently running version 5.0. This could be one of the signs for vigilant users to identify that there is something wrong with the downloaded file.

However, we recommend our readers to always install such apps from official websites and sources and refrain from using third-party app stores or websites for it.

Also, you can use Zoom alternatives if you’re not happy with the privacy and security offered by Zoom

SOURCEZDNet
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Anmol is a tech journalist who handles reportage of cybersecurity and Apple and OnePlus devices at Fossbytes. He's an ambivert who is striving hard to appease existential crisis by eating, writing, and scrolling through memes.