Facebook Revenge Porn
Image: QZ

Update: May 24, 2018
Facebook’s controversial program to fight revenge porn has now expanded beyond Austrailian borders. The company is expanding the pilot program to three more countries – US, UK, and Canada to prevent harassment and humiliation of users over the platform. However, the program still requires users to share nudes with a group of reviewers on Facebook.

Original story continues from here:

Social networks have faced a hard time trying to reduce incidents of revenge porn and users facing embarrassment in public.

Facebook, being the most prominent social network on the web, has developed tools to prevent such content from spreading and get removed as soon as possible.

Earlier this year, Facebook implemented a photo-matching tool in the US to stop sharing of content tagged as revenge porn in the past. Now, the blue network has come up with a new tool that would prevent a person from uploading revenge porn in the first place, according to an ABC report.

And for that, Facebook wants you to upload your nude snaps or videos on Messenger. The company won’t store the images directly but create a hash out of them using the anti-revenge porn tool.

If someone tries to upload explicit content matching that hash on platforms such as Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram, the company won’t allow it.

This seems to be a weird way to demote explicit content, but Facebook’s AI might better protect people if it already knows how they look in natural clothes.

The “industry-first” implementation of the tool is being done in four countries. Australia is one of them where Facebook has collaborated with a federal agency called e-Safety.

“They’re not storing the image, they’re storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies,” Julie Inman Grant, e-Safety Commissioner, told ABC.

“So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded.”

It’s not the case that every Facebook user would have to upload their nudes. If you fear that you’re a potential victim, you can contact e-Safety who might ask you to send your pictures to yourself on Messenger. Facebook would then store the corresponding hash.

Also Read: Top 5 Facebook Scams That You Should Be Aware Of