Windows 10 Update
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As it turns out, the issues in the Windows 10 October Update like the file deletion, or the absurd fonts were not just because Microsoft failed to do a good job, but also because we voluntarily signed up for those updates.

Apparently, if you manually click on “Check on Updates,” Microsoft will somehow consider you a “seeker” a.k.a tester, i.e., it will send you “preview” updates which haven’t been tested on a stable computer.

Michael Fortin explained the entire Windows 10 update process in a blog post

We also release optional updates in the third and fourth weeks of the month, respectively known as “C” and “D” releases. These are preview releases, primarily for commercial customers and advanced users “seeking” updates. These updates have only non-security fixes. The intent of these releases is to provide visibility into, and enable testing of, the non-security fixes that will be included in the next Update Tuesday release. Advanced users can access the “C” and “D” releases by navigating to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and clicking the “Check for updates” box. The “D” release has proven popular for those “seeking” to validate the non-security content of the next “B” release.

If we go by Fortin own words, clicking on “Check For Updates” means users will see a beta Windows 10 build on their PC. So if you are a normal user who doesn’t want trouble to get your PC, I would suggest you to stop clicking on “Check For Updates” from now own. Instead, wait for the update to install automatically.

However, if it’s a major feature update that you have waiting for, you can download the Windows Media Creation Tool to get the latest update.

Also Read: Windows 10 19H1 Build 18298 Adds Features To Notepad And Windows Console

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