Meet BvS10 Viking, The Swedish-Made Amphibious All-Terrain Tank

This armored vehicle can tread on mud, snow, water, and more.

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BvS10 viking moving on snow
Image: army-technology.com

In war, vehicles that can maneuver swiftly on different types of ground are very crucial. Add to it the ability to move in water bodies, and you have the most versatile war machine at your disposal. The British Army’s BvS10 (Bandvagn Skyddad 10), aka Viking, is one such multi-purpose leviathan enemy forces dread facing on the battlefield.

Originally built by Sweden’s Hägglunds Vehicle AB in tandem with the British Ministry of Defence, the Viking was intended to be used by the U.K. Royal Marines. It’s currently manufactured by BAE Systems AB and is in service for select nation’s armies. These countries include Sweden, the U.K., Austria, France, and the Netherlands.

Besides being a powerful armored tank, BvS10 can travel on difficult terrain and steer through the water as well. Here’s a clip showing the Viking forging its path across various challenging surfaces.

BvS10 Viking offers fearsome firepower and dogged mobility

Although not designed for carrying out the offensive, the BvS10 Viking provides the option for equipping a machine gun (7.62mm or 12.7mm) and a weapons system. For countering incoming attacks, the vehicle features armored protection strong enough to deflect 7.62mm ball rounds.

Apart from that, it can carry up to 12 personnel, including a maximum of 2 crewmen. Moreover, the Viking supports a payload weight of up to 800kg for its front unit, whereas the rear unit’s max capacity varies between 2000-3050kg. On top of that, it can also tow vehicles weighing as much as 3 tons (~2721.6kg).

Image: army-technology.com

Built upon the Bv206S, the tank features a 275hp Cummins engine that can go up to 65kmph on land and 5kmph on water. This resilient machine can work in freezing temperatures around -46°C and scorching environments rising to 49°C. Thanks to its two-chassis design, it has unmatched maneuverability on the most challenging terrains.

Since entering service with the U.K. Army in 2006, the amphibious tank has been a part of multiple weapons deals. While a combined 226 units are currently with Sweden and the U.K., the next big customer is the Netherlands, with 53 such tanks. Also, the Viking is expected to be in use beyond this decade.

Do you think this all-terrain tank ranks among the best out there? Tell us in the comments below. While you are here, make sure to check out how battle tanks came to be as we know them today.

Priye Rai

Priye Rai

Priye is a tech writer at Fossbytes, who writes about gaming and anything remotely related to tech, including smartphones, apps, OTT, etc. He prefers to be called a "video game journalist" and grimaces when he doesn't get to be "Player 1." If you want to talk about games or send any feedback, drop him a mail at [email protected]

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