Image Credti: AMD
Image Credit: AMD

Short Bytes: AMD has announced the mother of all graphics cards, Radeon Pro Solid State Graphics (SSG). Priced at $9,999, Pro SSG comes with a terabyte of SSD storage support provided by two PCIe 3.0 M.2 slots. The card is expected to hit the market in 2017.

Nvidia launched the new graphics card Titan X, with 12 gigs of DDR5 video memory, a few days ago. Titan X has enough juice to turn up the heartbeat of any hardcore gamer. The hunger for more graphics processing which results in jaw-dropping content delivery on the screen has become a necessity than a luxury as it was in earlier times.

AMD has announced the mother of all graphics cards to feed the hungry folks at the Capsaicin Siggraph 2016. Primarily designed for workstations, the Radeon Pro Solid State Graphics (SSG) — priced at $9,999 — comes with a terabyte of SSD-based storage support.

AMD demonstrated the video scrubbing of an 8K raw video at 90+ fps using the Pro SSG. The reading speed of a file stored on the computer SSD was 900MB per second and for a file stored on the SSG-connected SSD was a whopping 4GB per second.

With the Radeon Pro SSG, AMD has made a pocket burning attempt to break the memory barrier. Most modern graphics, even the high-end ones, have to rely on the motherboard connected storage option to add an extra chunk of memory if their inbuilt video memory maxes during graphics processing operations. Even AMD’s own graphics cards max out at 32 gigs of video RAM.

The additional memory required is gained by contacting the CPU and then accessing the system storage. AMD has equipped the Pro SSG with two PCIe 3.0 M.2 (NGFF) slots which enable the card to support up to 1TB of NAND flash memory. This would allow the graphics card to have its own memory reserve for those hard times when its video RAM would exhaust during the graphics processing. This SSD memory is, however, slower than the video memory but it is enough to save the pride of the graphics by keeping up the performance levels during back-breaking rendering sessions.

This would allow the graphics card to have its own memory reserve for those hard times when its video RAM would exhaust during the graphics processing. This SSD memory is, however, slower than the video memory but it is enough to save the pride of the graphics by keeping up the performance levels during back-breaking rendering sessions.

“Radeon™ Pro SSG is about “the art of the impossible”” – writes Antal Tungler, Senior Manager PR at AMD. “In medicine, Radeon™ Pro SSG technology can enable the creation of real-time 3D images of complex structures in action – such as a beating human heart.”

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Aditya Tiwari
Aditya likes to cover topics related to Microsoft, Windows 10, and interesting gadgets. But when he is not working, you can find him binge-watching random videos on YouTube (after he has wasted an hour on Netflix trying to find a good show). Reach out at [email protected]